Bronwen Everill on Abolition and Empire in West Africa

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To view the images below in full-screen, please click on them to open the gallery.


Welcome to the fifth episode of the Global History Podcast. Today, we’ll be hearing from Bronwen Everill, 1973 Lecturer in History at Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge. Dr. Everill is broadly interested, as she phrases it, “in the place of Africa and the role of Africans in the shaping of ideas about humanitarianism, empire, and commerce in the modern period.”

Her key works include the monograph Abolition and Empire in Sierra Leone and Liberia, and the edited collection The History and Practice of Humanitarian Intervention and Aid in Africa, co-edited with Josiah Kaplan. She’ll also have a new book out this year, titled Not Made By Slaves: Ethical Capitalism in the Age of Abolition

Last spring, when Chase was visiting the UK, he and Dr. Everill had a discussion about abolition and empire in West Africa in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. And on this segment, we’ll be sharing that conversation with you. 

If you have any thoughts, questions, or comments about this episode, or would like to pitch us an idea for a new episode, feel free to email us at theglobalhistorypodcast@gmail.com, or send us a message on our website’s contact formfacebooktwitter, or instagram.

GALLERY IMAGE 1: “John Leighton Wilson or an uncredited artist employed or licensed by him”, in Western Africa: Its History, Condition, and Prospects, by John Leighton Wilson (London; New York, 1856), opposite p. 419, downloaded from Wikipedia.

GALLERY IMAGE 2: “Unidentified Liberian man in suit with watch fob and papers and pencil in his breast pocket”, between 1853 and 1890. Photograph: approximate sixth-plate tintype, hand-colored; 9 x 6.5 cm (plate). AMB/TIN no. 1032 [P&P] LOT 8554, no. 1 (former call number). American Colonization Society Records, 1792-1964, Library of Congress.

GALLERY IMAGE 3: “Unidentified Liberian man in suit and bowtie”, between 1853 and 1890. Photograph: approximate sixth-plate tintype, hand-colored ; 9 x 6.5 cm (plate). AMB/TIN no. 1033 [P&P] LOT 8554, no. 2 (former call number). American Colonization Society Records, 1792-1964, Library of Congress.

GALLERY IMAGE 4: “Philip Coker [Chaplain of the Senate of Liberia], three-quarter length portrait, full face, seated, wearing spectacles”, between 1856 and 1860. Photograph: sixth plate daguerreotype. DAG no. 1010. American Colonization Society Records, 1792-1964, Library of Congress.

GALLERY IMAGE 5: “Captain Paul Cuffee 1812 / engraved for Abrm. L. Pennock by Mason & Maas.” “Print shows a silhouette head-and-shoulders portrait of Paul Cuffe, a prosperous businessman and sea captain, above a ship docked in a tropical region, possibly Sierra Leone”. Print: engraving. PGA – Mason & Maas–Captain Paul Cuffee 1812 (AA size) [P&P]. Popular Graphic Art Print Filing Series, Library of Congress.

GALLERY IMAGE 6: “Mrs. James Cheeseman, wife of the president of Liberia, full-length portrait, standing, facing left”. “A souvenir photograph produced by the Liberian Art Publishing Co. for distribution at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Ill.” 1893. Photographic print. LOT 8546 [item] [P&P]. American Colonization Society Collection, Library of Congress.

GALLERY IMAGE 7: “Map of the West Coast of Africa from Sierra Leone to Cape Palmas, including the colony of Liberia”. Philad[elphi]a [Pa.] : A. Finley, 1830. Contributors: Jehudi Ashmun, James Hamilton Young, Anthony Finley. Hand colored; 21 x 28 cm. G8882.C6 1830 .A8. Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress.

GALLERY IMAGE 8: “Map of Liberia”. Insert: “Vicinity of Monrovia / surveyed by J. Ashmun, 1825.” Baltimore [Md.] : Lith. by E. Weber & Co., 1845. Contributors: Randolph Coyle, William M’Lain, Jehudi Ashmun, Edward Weber & Co. “Relief shown by hachures.” 45 x 62 cm. Gift from the American Colonization Society in 1968. G8880 1845 .C6. Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress.

GALLERY IMAGE 9: “H. W. Erskine / T. M. Schleier, photographer, Nashville & Knoxville, Tenn.”, November 1866. “Photograph shows portrait of Liberian man in suit and bowtie.” Photographer: Theodore M. Schleier. photograph : approximate sixteenth-plate tintype; 10 x 6 cm (mat). AMB/TIN no. 1031 [P&P]. American Colonization Society Records, 1792-1964, Library of Congress.

GALLERY IMAGE 10: Liberian College, Monrovia. “Photograph shows male students posed on the balconies of Liberian College, Monrovia, Liberia.” Philadelphia: Liberian Art Publishing Co., 1893. Photographic print: albumen. “Printed on back of mount: Exhibit, World’s Fair, Chicago, Ill., U.S.A., 1893.” LOT 8546 [item] [P&P]. American Colonization Society Collection, Library of Congress.

GALLERY IMAGE 11: “James Skivring Smith, three-quarter length portrait, three-quarters view, seated at desk”, between 1856 and 1850. “Smith was born in Charleston, South Carolina. Arrived in Liberia in 1833. Secretary of State of Liberia, 1856-1860. Senator, Grand Bassa County, 1868-1869. Vice president under Edward Roye, 1870-1871. Superintendent Grand Bassa County, 1874-1884.” “Written on back plate: Doctor J. S. Smith, Senator from Bassa Co.” Photograph: sixth plate daguerreotype. DAG no. 1002. American Colonization Society Records, 1792-1964, Library of Congress.

GALLERY IMAGE 12: A. J. Cross, between 1853 and 1900. “Photograph shows portrait of Liberian man in suit and tie with hat.” Photograph: approximate sixth-plate tintype, hand-colored; 9 x 6 cm (plate). AMB/TIN no. 1030 [P&P] LOT 8554, no. 3 (former call number). American Colonization Society Records, 1792-1964, Library of Congress.

GALLERY IMAGE 13 and COVER IMAGE: Liberated Slaves Arriving in Sierra Leone, from Samuel Griswold Goodrich, A System of School Geography Chiefly Derived from Malte-Brun, 20th ed. (New York, 1839), p. 194, accessed via archive.org.

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